Google

PUSHKIN'S POEMS

HomeLermontov Other Pushkin Onegin Book I Book II Book III Book IV Book V BookVI BookVII BookVIII Next stanzas Previous stanzas

EUGENE ONEGIN

(In this edition he is called Yevgeny Onegin).

 

BOOK IV    Stanzas 23 - 26.

XXIII

Что было следствием свиданья?
Увы, не трудно угадать!
Любви безумные страданья
Не перестали волновать
Младой души, печали жадной;
Нет, пуще страстью безотрадной
Татьяна бедная горит;
Ее постели сон бежит;
Здоровье, жизни цвет и сладость,
Улыбка, девственный покой,
Пропало все, что звук пустой,
И меркнет милой Тани младость:
Так одевает бури тень
Едва рождающийся день.
 

XXIII


What was the sequel to their meeting?
Alas, it is not difficult to guess.
The frantic pain of violent love
Did not cease to agitate and oppress
With quenchless longing her young breast.
Indeed, far worse, with cheerless desire
Wretched Tatyana is on fire,
And sleep deserts her bed completely.
Health, life's colour and its sweetness,
Her smile and girlish serene calm
Quite disappeared, as empty sound,
And fair Tatyana's youth then faded;
Just as the storm clouds often slay
The scarcely breathing new born day.

 XXIV


Увы, Татьяна увядает,
Бледнеет, гаснет и молчит!
Ничто ее не занимает,
Ее души не шевелит.
Качая важно головою,
Соседи шепчут меж собою:
Пора, пора бы замуж ей!..
Но полно. Надо мне скорей
Развеселить воображенье
Картиной счастливой любви.
Невольно, милые мои,
Меня стесняет сожаленье;
Простите мне: я так люблю
Татьяну милую мою!

 

XXIV


Alas, Tatyana withers, alters,
Grows pale, grows silent, perishes!
Nothing at all seems to distract her,
Or fill her soul with living wishes.
Shaking their heads most solemnly,
The neighbours whisper to each other:
'Tis time, 'tis time for wedding bells!
But enough, enough. For I must  swiftly
Brighten and enliven this gloomy scene
With a picture of a love that's happy.
Although, dear reader, I confess,
Pity has taken control of me.
Forgive me, for I am quite crazy
With dear Tatyana, and her looks amaze me.

XXV

Час от часу плененный боле
Красами Ольги молодой,
Владимир сладостной неволе
Предался полною душой.
Он вечно с ней. В ее покое
Они сидят в потемках двое;
Они в саду, рука с рукой,
Гуляют утренней порой;
И что ж? Любовью упоенный,
В смятенье нежного стыда,
Он только смеет иногда,
Улыбкой Ольги ободренный,
Развитым локоном играть
Иль край одежды целовать.

 
XXV


But from hour to hour and most devotedly,
Entranced with his Olga's youth and beauty,
Vladimir to the sweet captivity
Gave up his spirit absolutely.
He was always with her. And in her room
They sit together in the darkness;
Then to the garden, hand in hand
They stroll out in the early morn.
And what else then? In finest rapture
Embarassed and with tender modesty
He only dares most hesitantly,
Encouraged by a smile from her
To fondle a curl that has gone astray,
Or with the hem of her dress to kiss and play.

 

XXVI

Он иногда читает Оле
Нравоучительный роман,
В котором автор знает боле
Природу, чем Шатобриан,
А между тем две, три страницы
(Пустые бредни, небылицы,
Опасные для сердца дев)
Он пропускает, покраснев.
Уединясь от всех далеко,
Они над шахматной доской,
На стол облокотясь, порой
Сидят, задумавшись глубоко,
И Ленской пешкою ладью
Берет в рассеяньи свою.

 
XXVI


Then sometimes he would read to Olga
A novel that was morally supreme,
In which the author knows more of nature
Than ever was known by Chateaubriand.
In the course of which, two or three pages,
(Trifling nonsense, fairy tales,
But unsuitable for younger girls)
He would pass over with a blush.
Then far away from all, retreating,
Around the chess board they would sit
Their elbows on the table leaning,
And deeply then their brows would knit,
And Lensky would falsely take a rook,
An air of abstraction in his look.

 


Lermontov Other Pushkin Onegin Book I Book II Book III Book IV Book V BookVI BookVII BookVIII Next stanzas Previous stanzas
Home Oxquarry Books Ltd Shakespeare's Sonnets








Google

 

Copyright 2001 - 2009 of this site belongs to Oxquarry Books Ltd.